The Apple

February 21, 2022 00:02:01
The Apple
Dogs Are Smarter Than People: Writing Life, Marriage and Motivation
The Apple
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Hosted By

Carrie Jones Shaun Farrar

Show Notes

Hi! This year (2022), I've decided to share a poem on my blog and podcast and read it aloud. It's all a part of my quest to be brave and apparently the things that I'm scared about still include:

  1. My spoken voice
  2. My raw poems.

Thanks for being here with me and cheering me on and I hope that you can become braver this year, too!

The apple fell to the ground joining the others; rotting had already begun the way it does. We all fall and crack. On the wire a squirrel ran to the right, green apple in her mouth, prized obviously, bigger than her head. Another fell before a second squirrel appeared, apple in mouth, bounding on the wire to the left this time. I know I’m not the squirrels. I know I am not an apple (though I feel round lately), but I gather things too big to hold and drop so many, bringing them to the road where they’ll be carried off by others or maybe smooshed under wheels of cars or just left to rot. I know. I’m not the apple rolling aimlessly until I can’t move anymore. I know.

Hey, thanks for listening to Carrie Does Poems. These podcasts and more writing tips are at Carrie’s website, carriejonesbooks.blog. There’s also a donation button there. Even a dollar inspires a happy dance in Carrie, so thank you for your support. The music you hear is made available through the creative commons and it’s a bit of a shortened track from the fantastic Eric Van der Westen and the track is called A Feather and off the album The Crown Lobster Trilogy.

While Carrie only posts poems weekly here, she has them (in written form) almost every weekday over on Medium. You should check it out!

https://freemusicarchive.org/music/eric-van-der-westen/the-crown-lobster-trilogy-selection

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