Sam Spellacy Friend of Awesome, Jackson Lab Research Technologist, Animal Rescuer

April 23, 2020 00:25:54
Sam Spellacy Friend of Awesome, Jackson Lab Research Technologist, Animal Rescuer
Dogs Are Smarter Than People: Writing Life, Marriage and Motivation
Sam Spellacy Friend of Awesome, Jackson Lab Research Technologist, Animal Rescuer
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Hosted By

Carrie Jones Shaun Farrar

Show Notes

You know how sometimes you need a real-life friend of awesome who torments you so that you evolve? And sometimes you don't know how to say that friend's last name.

That's Sam for me.

Sam is a research technologist at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor and she joins me to talk about evolving, being brave, and how hard it is to be my friend. Just kidding! Just kidding!

Sort of.

Sam does some pretty exciting research with Ron Korstange and the lab itself is doing tons of research and testing related to Covid-19.


RECENT EPISODES OF AWESOME AND BONUS INTERVIEWS

This week’s episode link. 

Last week’s episode link 

Link to Sam's interview.

A bonus interview with Dr. J.L. Delozier, Pennsylvania doctor and writer. 

bonus interview with poet and coach Fiona Mackintosh Cameron. 

Other Episodes

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September 21, 2021 00:21:42
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Alligator Romance with Darth Gator and the grammar behind the words in to vs into

So, now that we’re into the helpful part of the podcast and no longer talking about women in love with the alligators that attacked them or dogs and cats breaking records together, we thought we’d take a quick look at a big grammar mistake. And that’s when INTO is one word or two. Is it . . . Dude, I am so into you. Or is it . . . Dude, I am so in to you. Here’s how it works. INTO all as one word is a preposition, which means it’s showing MOVEMENT of one thing to another thing. But IN TO (two words) has two grammatical bits going on right there. The IN is an adverb and the TO is the preposition. And they aren’t like snuggled up in bed like a cohabitating couple, they just tend to show up in the sentence next to each other. Here are some examples: INTO as one word: Baby, I made it into the office today, but only just barely because… cough… you know. Lordie, look what Santa put into your stocking. That alligator went into that woman’s head, man, like took total control. INTO usually tells you WHERE something is happening. IN TO as two words Look, I am standing in to make a statement to our senator. Santa came in to say a hearty hello. The dog and cat rode in to break that record on that damn scooter. IN TO usually can be substituted with IN ORDER TO. Easy, right? Consider yourself grammatical. WRITING TIP OF THE POD Two words are different than one. DOG TIP FOR LIFE Sometimes taking chances pays off (like when you jump on a scooter with a cat) and sometimes it doesn’t (like when you bite your handler’s hand). Choose your risks ...

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April 16, 2020 00:30:02
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Wild Poet Women - Bonus Podcast with Poet Fiona Cameron Mackintosh!

Hey! Welcome to a bonus interview episode of Dogs are Smarter Than People, the usually quirky podcast that gives writing tips and life tips. I’m Carrie Jones and with me today is  Fiona Cameron Mackintosh is a poet from Toronto and manages Elderwood Coaching who doesn’t believe in tame language for wild things, which is possibly the best thing I’ve ever heard.  What do we talk about? You'll want to listen but here's a heads-up: Poetry. Why do you think people are so scared of it?  What was the first poem that you remember that rocked your world?  Is it okay to misquote poetry? How do you become a poet? Fiona is absolutely amazing. You'll definitely want to listen. Direct Link to Fiona's Interview! Fiona's very cool website and coaching collective. Another podcast with Fiona Fiona on Facebook. This week's regular episode - The Two Second Relationship Rule SO, HERE’S WHAT I’M UP TO.  THE WRITING COURSE OF AWESOME It’s our very own writing course!  Basically, it’s set up a bit like a distance MFA program, only it costs a lot less and also has a big element of writer ...

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October 05, 2021 00:21:32
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Big Foot Fights and Trailer Sauce and No Flat Writing

A lot of writers will worry that their stories seem flat. There’s a reason that they are worrying about that and it’s one of the core elements of good writing. Ready? You want to vary your sentence structure. Take a bit of writing that you’ve done that feels flat—or maybe even one that doesn’t. Count the words in your sentences for two or three paragraphs. Are they all five words? Twelve? Twenty-seven? That robotic sameness in sentence length is one of the main reasons that writing can feel flat. It’s like those ancient Dick and Jane books. See Dick run. See Jane skip. See Dick wave. The other big bugger is when all of your sentences are simple and declarative. I walk to the forest. The trees are gracious, tall. I inhale the pine scent. There is actually a whole, entire world of different sentence styles that writers can use and when you use them? That’s when you make your writing shiny and sexy and all the good things. The names for these structures are pretty boring, honestly, but we’ll try to look beyond that, right? Simple – You have one main clause. Carrie is the best wife. Compound – You have more than one independent clause. You probably use a conjunction.             Carrie wants to get another dog, but Shaun keeps saying no. Complex – Oh, the sentence that probably has to pay for a therapist or is reading Foucault obviously in the park. This sentence has an independent clause and a subordinate clause. It’st the BDSM of sentences.             When hell freezes over, we will allegedly get another dog. Compound-Complex – It sounds like a place with a cult, right? But it’s just a sentence with at least two independent clauses and one subordinate clause. Carrie really ...

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