Interview with the amazing author Anne Marie Pace - Bonus Podcast Episode

May 28, 2020 00:31:51
Interview with the amazing author Anne Marie Pace - Bonus Podcast Episode
Dogs Are Smarter Than People: Writing Life, Marriage and Motivation
Interview with the amazing author Anne Marie Pace - Bonus Podcast Episode
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Hosted By

Carrie Jones Shaun Farrar

Show Notes

Hey! Welcome to a bonus interview episode of Dogs are Smarter Than People, the usually quirky podcast that gives writing tips and life tips. I’m Carrie Jones and with me today is Anne Marie Pace

Anne Marie Pace!

Anne Marie is an authenticity rock star. She’s the author of Vamperina Ballerina, Pigloo, Sonny’s Tow-truck, human-parent to animals and humans. She likes to read, cook, do some fine choral singing and be an all-around great friend. Anne Marie, it is so great for you to be here. 

We talk about the inspiration for Vampirina Ballerina, a vampire who wants to take ballet lessons, cats who throw up and dogs who eat it, openness and mental health and being authentic even on social media.

I hope you'll give it a listen and support one of the coolest writers around.

Find out more about Anne Marie at her website.

Okay, well, my website is annemariepace.com, her Twitter is AnneMariePace, and her Vampirina page is http://www.facebook.com/VampirinaBallerina


WHERE TO FIND OUR PODCAST, DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE.

The podcast link if you don’t see it above. Plus, it’s everywhere like Apple Music, iTunesStitcherSpotify, and more. Just google, “DOGS ARE SMARTER THAN PEOPLE” then like and subscribe.

Join the 230,000 people who have downloaded episodes and marveled at our raw weirdness. You can subscribe pretty much anywhere.

This week’s episode.

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